Xsan: Client cannot access certain folders on Xsan volume, or cannot access an entire volume

Learn how to resolve three scenarios that one may encounter when attempting to access files on Xsan volumes or the volumes themselves:

  • Scenario 1: A client may be unable to access folders on an Xsan volume. A red minus sign icon may appear on the folders, and when trying to access data, the Finder may state "The folder 'name' could not be opened because you do not have sufficient access privileges." If using the command line to attempt to navigate, this alert may appear: "Permission denied."

     
  • Scenario 2: A client may be unable to access a folder or Xsan volume, but no red prohibitory icon appears on the volume or folder icons. When trying to access the volume or a folder on it, the Finder may state "The folder 'name' could not be opened because you do not have sufficient access privileges." If using the command line to attempt to navigate, this alert may appear: "Permission denied."

     
  • Scenario 3: A client may not be able to perform basic file operations within an Xsan volume, or folder/file on the volume. In this situation, a lock icon may be visible on the volume/folder/icon in the Finder. This may occur even if the user's account has been given correct permissions. The Finder may become unresponsive.

Scenario 1 troubleshooting

If a user is unable to navigate to an Xsan volume or a subfolder (which has a red minus sign icon on it in the Finder), or access it via the command line, the user’s account has probably not been granted permissions to the volume or folder.

In such cases, either POSIX permissions or the Access Control List is not configured to allow access for a given user or group of users to access the Xsan volume or data on the volume. 

Solution

To resolve this issue, the Xsan administrator, or the owner of the Xsan volume or subfolder, must adjust the permissions to allow access to user account. To do so, they may either alter Ownership or Permissions in a Get Info pane, or they may do so in the Terminal by using the chmod, chown and chgrp commands.

For more information about using these commands, type the following respective command in Terminal:

man chmod
man chown
man chgrp

Scenario 2 troubleshooting

Symptoms: A user is unable to access a folder or Xsan volume, but no red prohibitory icon appears on the volume or folder icons, or when trying to access the volume or a folder on it, the Finder may state "The folder 'name' could not be opened because you do not have sufficient access privileges." If using the command line to attempt to navigate, this alert may appear: "Permission denied."

In such cases, the permissions on the volume or subfolder may not include the execute permission.

Solution (using Finder)

To resolve this issue using the Finder, use Get Info on the Xsan volume or subfolder and edit the permissions so that the the desired user is given Read+Write or Read-Only permissions.
 

Solution (using Terminal)

To resolve this issue via the Terminal, enable the execute permission for the affected volume by executing the following command:

sudo chmod +x /Volumes/VolumeName

... where VolumeName is the name of the Xsan volume that is to be given the execute permission.

If a specific folder is exhibiting this symptom, enable the execute permission for the affected Folder by executing the following command in the Terminal:

sudo chmod +x /Volumes/VolumeName/pathToFile

...where VolumeName is the name of the Xsan volume and pathToFile is the path to the file or folder that is to be given the execute permission.
 

Scenario 3 troubleshooting

Symptoms: A client may not be able to perform some file operations (see below) within an Xsan volume, or folder/file on the volume. In this situation, a lock icon may be visible on the volume/folder/icon in the Finder. This may occur even if the user's account has been given correct permissions.

Note: The lock on a file may not be visible on files in the Finder. To determine if a file is locked, Get info on the file and see if the Locked checkbox has been selected.

"Some file operations" refers to issues the client may have when trying to:

  • Change permissions of a directory or file
  • Create a directory or file
  • Delete a directory or file
  • Rename a directory or file
  • Move a directory of file
  • Move a directory or file to the trash

When trying to perform these operations in the Finder, the operations will not succeed. In such cases, the Finder may appear to be unresponsive and options to create New Folder and other menu options will be not be selectable.

When trying to perform these operations at the command-line, the following may appear, "Operation not permitted".

In cases such as these, the uchg flag has been set for the Xsan volume or subfolder.

To unlock individual file/folders

To resolve this issue for a file/folder using the Finder, the file/folder owner should use Get Info to unlock the file/folder.

To unlock one folder or file in the Terminal, run the following command in the Terminal:

sudo chflags nouchg /Volumes/VolumeName/pathToFile

...where VolumeName is the name of the Xsan volume and pathToFile is the path to the file or folder that is to be unlocked.


To unlock all file/folders

To unlock all files and folders on the Xsan volume, run the following command in the Terminal:

sudo chflags -R nouchg /Volumes/VolumeName

... where VolumeName is the name of the Xsan volume that is to be unlocked.


To unlock the root of the Xsan volume

To unlock the root of the Xsan volume (if a lock icon appears on the volume), use this Terminal command:

sudo chflags nouchg /Volumes/VolumeName

... where VolumeName is the name of the Xsan volume that is to be unlocked.

Published Date: