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Archived - Common System Error Messages: What they Mean and What Might Help Resolve the Problem

Common Macintosh system errors: a listing of common causes, possible solutions, and some explanations of what they mean.

This article has been archived and is no longer updated by Apple.

Type 1 error (Bus Error)

One of the most common indications of a memory-related error. It means that you tried to access an non-existent/inaccessible memory address.

Common causes and solutions: Init/Extension or Control Panel conflict. insufficient memory for the operation being attempted, you could try allotting more memory to the application.

Type 2 error (Address Error)

Very similar to a Type 1 error. Some piece of information was written to the wrong place in memory. Attempting to access data larger than a byte on an odd address (68000 processor) or an instruction at an odd address.

Common causes and solutions: Init/Extension or Control Panel conflict. insufficient memory for the operation being attempted, you could try allotting more memory to the application. The instruction being requested may not be supported on the CPU. i.e. an 030 request on an 68000 processor

Type 10 error (line 1111 trap error)

This is an attempt to execute an instruction that does not exist in the CPUÃs repertoire (Unimplemented instruction error). Lack of support for the machine on which it is being run (for example, a 68020 instruction execution attempt on a 68000).

Type -36 error (I/O Errors (bummers)

This file is having difficulty while either reading from the drive or writing to the drive. The file
may have been improperly written data to the drive or the hard drive or disk may be damaged.
This is almost always indicative of a media error (hard error on the disk). Sometimes (rarely) it is transient.

Solutions: Try copying the file to another drive. Use a disk recovery software, such as Disk First Aid to examine the disk. You can try rebooting with all extensions off. Once in a while this will allow you to read the data. The file in question should be restored from a backup that was stored on a different disk. Regular backups can reduce the time to recover from this error.

Type -39 error (Logical End-of-file reached during read operation)

The Macintosh was expecting a marker to show it where the end of the file is on the disk. That marker is either missing or is in the wrong place. A crash is the most common cause, however a disk error or corrupt file can also cause this.

Solutions: Recovering the file frequently fixes the problem. If it does not, make a clone of a backup, open the clone and try to import from the file that is giving the -39 error message.
In other applications, using an Import or Insert command from inside a new document frequently works around the problem. You also might move/copy the file to another volume.

Type -43 error (File not found, Folder not found)

The item that the program was looking for is not in the location that it was supposed to be. This is a common error with the Claris XTND system. Often this error is in reference to a translator that cannot be found.

Solutions: Try trashing the XTND translator list in the Preferences folder in the System Folder. and restarting the application. Verify that the Claris XTND System document and the Translators folder are in the Claris folder.

Last Modified: Dec 21, 2012
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  • Last Modified: Dec 21, 2012
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